How much does it cost to charge an electric vehicle in the US?

How much does it cost to charge an electric vehicle in the US?

For many people that switch to electric vehicles from internal combustion engine cars, the deciding factor was the lower cost of charging the battery. This reduction in refueling costs is because electricity is usually cheaper than gas in most places.

For many people that switch to electric vehicles from internal combustion engine cars, the deciding factor was the lower cost of charging the battery. This reduction in refueling costs is because electricity is usually cheaper than gas in most places.

However, if you are planning to get an electric car, it is essential to know how much you will spend on charging. This article looks at how much it could cost you to charge an electric car on average in the US. We have also thrown in some tips on how to cut down your cost of charging.

How much does it cost to charge an electric vehicle in the US?

While it is true generally that you pay less to charge an electric vehicle than to pump gas into an ICE car, the answer to how much you pay to charge an electric vehicle varies based on location. The reason for this is because the cost of electricity varies from state to state.

For example, the average cost of electricity in California is about $0.18 per kWh. This means if you charge a Nissan LEAF which has a 40 kWh battery to 100 percent, it will cost you about $7. Bear in mind that this will net you about 150 miles.

From the figures above, you can extrapolate how much you will pay weekly on charging. If you drive about 30 miles daily, it means $7 electricity will last five days.

The calculations above are for home or residential charging. If you prefer to use a public charger, be prepared to pay more. However, how you pay may differ from one charging network to another. For example, some charging networks require you to maintain a membership apart from the actual cost of charging. Due to state-level restrictions, you might be charged for how long your charging takes in some places instead of paying for the electricity.

Californian EV drivers can expect to pay up to $0.3 per kWh on public Level 2 chargers or $0.4 on DC fast chargers. Using the Nissan LEAF as an example again, a full charge may cost you $12 to $16.

How to reduce your charging costs

You can still cut down on your charging cost by taking these tips; look for opportunities to charge for free, schedule your charging to times when electricity is cheaper like during off-peak periods, use regenerative braking as much as possible to top up your battery while you drive, avoid rapid acceleration, etc.

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